JOB Related Topics

 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

BBEWARE

Getting caught lying on a resume can scuttle years of genuine hard work and achievement.

Some people can call it enhancing, polishing or embellishing, but most human resources people and managers call it lying. Overstating your qualifications on a resume has always been tempting to some, but it's even more prevalent now that companies are receiving hundreds of applicants for each position. In an effort to stand out from the crowd, some job seekers will stretch the truth until it screams like it was on a medieval rack.

A job seeker can present a resume that gets him or her an interview without having to outright lie. Job seekers need to boil down their prior contributions, their skills and talents and craft the resume in a way that gets the reader's attention.

The first rule of thumb is never to lie on a resume. Some human resources people estimate that as many as one in five job seekers fibs somewhere on his or her resume.

The first rule of thumb is never to lie on a resume. Some human resources people estimate that as many as one in five job seekers fibs somewhere on his or her resume.

And the chances of getting caught are greater these days, as companies take a closer look at the candidates they hire, scrutinizing backgrounds and checking references.People are asking for a greater scope than they were before. that performs background checks for companies.

Education used to be the least-checked item on a resume, but now companies are delving into that with a closer look. Most often job seekers will lie on a resume to cover up something they feel is a deficit, such as a lack of experience. But, say career experts, your resume can be crafted in such a way that it remains truthful but highlights your talents and downplays your weaker areas.The first step is to focus on your previous positions and really boil down your contributions.

Write down each task you performed and its ultimate impact on the business. Did it save the company money? Did it improve productivity or quality?. What you are really doing is focusing on an end result?. A lot of people know what they did, but they don't always focus on the end result. What every employer wants to know is how you cut costs or increased revenues. It's really about time and money. "Consider a process or problem that you faced, what action you took to address it and the result to the company. It's that sparkling result that should make it into a line on your resume. The more specific you can be, the stronger the resume.

If you have a spotty tenure with former employers, lasting just a few months, then don't include some of the non-pertinent ones on your resume. Note where you worked in terms of years, not month to month. If you have a longer gap between jobs, be prepared with a good explanation to give in a well-written cover letter. Consider how you present the information on your resume, say career experts.Start with an outline of your strengths and achievements, and place less-glowing areas toward the end.